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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

147 Hikes
Suiattle River Trail

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
13.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 900 ft.
Highest Point: 2500.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.80
(5 votes)
Trail Closed: The Suiattle River Road is closed just west of the Downey Creek Bridge until October 6 2021 due to forest fire damage.
The trail winds its way above the Suiattle River through old-growth forest and some mature forest recovering from an old burn from the 1920’s. The vegetation in the upper Suiattle watershed includes a wonderful mixture of west-of-the-crest/east-fo-the-crest species.
 
 
Mount Dickerman

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
8.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3950 ft.
Highest Point: 5760.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.63
(110 votes)
If the best views come to those who earn them, Mount Dickerman offers the fairest vantage along the Mountain Loop. You’ll huff and puff through 4,000 feet of elevation on your way to the summit; in return, you’ll get a superb panorama of nearly every peak in the Mountain Loop. In late summer, it also rewards the intrepid with a bounty of mountain blueberries.
 
 
Lost Creek Ridge

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
14.0 miles, one-way
Gain: 5000 ft.
Highest Point: 5700.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.57
(7 votes)
A rugged trail that offers stunning views and access to several beautiful backcountry lakes.
 
 
Lake 22

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
5.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1350 ft.
Highest Point: 2400.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.26
(322 votes)
The curiously-named Lake Twentytwo is the center of an oasis of alpine wetland nestled on the northern shoulder of Mount Pilchuck. The hike to the lake combines the best of mountain rainforests, old-growth, wetlands, and mountain views, yet it is readily accessible. In winter the route lends itself to snowshoeing.
 
 
Heather Lake

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
4.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1034 ft.
Highest Point: 2430.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.99
(142 votes)
After you've explored a few trails with your little one, the Heather Lake trail makes a wonderful next step. It's the perfect place to take children on their first ‘real’ hike. The trail is short, but steep and challenging--it'll give a child a real sense of accomplishment once they reach the lake. The lake itself is a scenic little lake located on the northeastern slope of Mount Pilchuck.
 
 
Green Mountain

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
8.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3300 ft.
Highest Point: 6500.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.31
(32 votes)
In a state with so many places offering a day's walk to big, peaky views, Green Mountain still makes the short-list of Washington's all-time finest hikes. From woods to meadows to panoramic views and even a historic lookout, it just doesn't get much better than this.
 
 
Goat Lake

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
10.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1400 ft.
Highest Point: 3161.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.21
(121 votes)
A nice hike with plenty of variety. Beautiful forest, a rushing creek, waterfalls of all shapes and sizes, history, and of course a large blue-green lake surrounded by snowy peaks. At 10.4 miles, it can be either a day-hike or a quick early season overnight. You won’t be alone, though – this is a popular trail with both hikers and backpackers.
 
 
Boulder River

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
8.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 700 ft.
Highest Point: 1550.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.93
(123 votes)
The Boulder River trail is a nice hike that can be done any time of year. Come in winter while the rain is dripping off the mossy trees, photograph the waterfalls filled with spring snowmelt. Take the kids out for a little picnic in the summer, or leaf collecting in the fall. Come anytime midweek for quiet contemplation.
 
 
Barlow Point

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
2.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 800 ft.
Highest Point: 3200.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.54
(13 votes)
From Barlow Point’s rocky promontory, hikers can take in views of Mount Dickerman, Big Four, and Stillaguamish Peak.
 
 
Ashland Lakes

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
5.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 800 ft.
Highest Point: 3000.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.64
(25 votes)
Hike a trail built mostly of boardwalk planking through peaty bogs beside three quiet little lakes. Established campsites with fire pits, benches and tent platforms await a weekend of camping with the kids. This trail also makes a pleasant weekday hike for those with creaky knees, as it is not difficult. As you hike, enjoy the many plants and animals that make the lowland bog environment home.
 
 
Mallardy Ridge Snowshoe

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
10.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1900 ft.
Highest Point: 3200.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(2 votes)
On a clear day, some of the area’s most notable peaks are visible from the crest of Mallardy Ridge, reached by snowshoeing along an easy-to-follow route.
 
 
Glacier Peak Meadows

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
25.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4350 ft.
Highest Point: 6450.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
5.00
(1 vote)
The climb up the North Fork Trail to the Pacific Crest Trail is steep and often buggy, but vast meadows of wildflowers and alpine heaven are the well-earned reward.
 
 
Round Lake

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
11.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4300 ft.
Highest Point: 5600.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.44
(9 votes)
 
While Round Lake, tucked securely in a hidden basin on Lost Creek Ridge, is a wonderful locale, this hike is definitely more about the journey than the destination. After a demanding initial grunt, amble along a mile-high, flower-swaying, peak-packed, view-granting ridge. Savor one of the finest vantages for admiring spiraling Sloan Peak's sprawling sparkling glacier. And if you can ever move your eyes away from this mesmerizing mountain, a multitude of others demand your attention as well.
 
 
Painted Mountain (Red Mountain)

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4875 ft.
Highest Point: 6975.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.33
(6 votes)
 
A climber's trail past the abandoned lookout on Painted Mountain to higher elevations. Experience and comfort with scrambling necessary for this hike.
 
 
Pilot Ridge

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
Rating:
Average rating:
2.80
(5 votes)
 
A steep, infrequently maintained trail that is part of the White Pass-Pilot ridge Loop.
 
 
North Fork Sauk River

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
11.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1000 ft.
Highest Point: 2800.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.12
(8 votes)
Some trails go to lakes, some to high viewpoints. This trail is all about the forest, and what a forest it is! Old-growth trees reach for the sky on either side of a brush-free trail, since understory is minimal when the big old trees block out the light. Find fantastic mushrooms here in the fall and forest wildflowers in the spring and early summer.
 
 
North Fork Sauk Falls

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
0.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 1500.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(8 votes)
This short trail descends 200 feet to the base of a large 45-foot waterfall.
 
 
Harold Engles Memorial Cedars

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 1800.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
This is a half-mile loop hike past giant cedar trees preserved by Harold Engles, a famous Forest Ranger.
 
 
White Pass - Pilot Ridge Loop

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
29.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 7500 ft.
Highest Point: 6360.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.75
(12 votes)
A loop hike, beginning and ending in the old-growth forests of the North Fork Sauk River that traverses high ridges and passes of the Pacific crest, visits beautiful alpine lakes, and finally follows the high and lonesome Pilot Ridge Trail before descending back down to the trail junction on the North Fork Sauk River.
 
 
Sloan Peak

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
9.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2900 ft.
Highest Point: 7835.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(6 votes)
This route on the north side of Sloan Peak is steep and challenging. Hikers with navigational skills can make it to the base of the peak -- climbing gear and expertise is needed to achieve the summit.
 
 
Red Mountain Lookout

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
2.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 700 ft.
Highest Point: 2800.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.50
(2 votes)
This seldom-used trail within Glacier Peak Wilderness leads through an old-growth forest with magnificent, large trees to the site of an old fire lookout build in the 1930s.
 
 
Bald Mountain via Ashland Lakes

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
20.0 miles, one-way
Rating:
Average rating:
2.33
(6 votes)
It used to be possible to traverse from Ashland Lakes to Bald Mountain, Cutthroat Lakes, and the Walt Bailey trail on trail. Now, the way is an overgrown, hard-to-follow bushwhack.
 
 
Cutthroat Lakes via Walt Bailey Trail

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
6.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2300 ft.
Highest Point: 4700.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(4 votes)
Great views await you at the summit of Bald Mountain or Cutthroat Lakes if you can stand the rough, rocky, and rooty trail that you must brave to get there. Fortunately, lots of lakes and berries keep you busy along the way, and the ever-changing surroundings on this CCC-built, WTA-maintained trail make for a great day hike along the popular Mountain Loop Highway.
 
 
Three Fingers

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
15.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4200 ft.
Highest Point: 6854.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.59
(17 votes)
 
A very challenging hike to a lookout in the Mountain Loop Area. Hike a road, then along a trail to gorgeous Goat Flats. From there, the route kicks up in difficulty as it accesses Tin Can Gap. The final push, up ladders rebarred into rock is exposed, and surefootedness is an absolute must at the lookout.
 
 
Mount Pilchuck

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
5.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2300 ft.
Highest Point: 5327.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.58
(184 votes)
Despite its intermediate difficulty, Mount Pilchuck sees a slew of visitors in a given year, as hikers flock to the trail for its grand panoramic views and historic restored fire lookout. Easily one of the most rewarding hikes in the area, its relatively short 2.7 mile, 2,300 feet ascent gifts you 360-degree views of Mount Baker, Mount Rainier and the Olympics from its shelter lookout, which sits nestled on a summit that tops out around 5,300 feet. This calf-friendly journey is all made possible by a high elevation trailhead, which sets you off on your travels around 3,000 feet, cutting what would otherwise be an arduous ten mile roundtrip in half.
 
 
Verlot Nature Trail

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
0.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 13 ft.
Highest Point: 1035.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(4 votes)
The Verlot Nature Trail connects the Verlot Campground with Turlo Campground.
 
 
Big Four Ice Caves

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
2.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 220 ft.
Highest Point: 1938.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.94
(105 votes)
Trail closed: The bridge over the Stillaguamish River has been removed for repairs rendering the Big Four Ice Caves inaccessible
Never go into or climb on top of the Ice Caves
This is an easy walk on a wide gravel and boardwalk path to views of Big Four Mountain and the caves beneath the snow. Hikers of all ages and abilities can enjoy this trail.
 
 
Vesper Peak

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4000 ft.
Highest Point: 6214.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.52
(27 votes)
Vesper Peak is definitely not for the novice hiker, but for those thirsting for one step beyond hiking into backcountry adventure, it's a good leaping off point. The smooth, low angle granite of Vesper's upper reaches make for relatively easy off-trail travel and beginning routefinding.
 
 
Headlee Pass and Vesper Lake

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2700 ft.
Highest Point: 4950.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.90
(20 votes)
Vesper Lake is squeezed, like a thumbprint in clay, deep in the saddle between the twin summits of Sperry Peak and Vesper Peak. Rarely is a lake situated so close and steeply below two summits like this–its unique setting gives you remarkably up-close (and straight-up) views of mountainous terrain. And all that comes after the former mining trail that provides incredible scenery along the way.
 
 
Mine Road Trail

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 650 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.76
(21 votes)
A nice afternoon hike near Darrington up an abandoned road to an old mine.