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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

3897 Hikes
Burley Mountain

South Cascades -- White Pass/Cowlitz River Valley

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4000 ft.
Highest Point: 5250.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.17
(6 votes)
One of just three remaining lookouts on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, Burley Mountain Lookout was built in 1934 and is still active today. This route utilizes nature trails, a forest road, and a short hiking trail to access this unique site just south of Highway 12.
 
 
Sumas Mountain - Gold Mine Trail

Puget Sound and Islands -- Bellingham Area

 
Rating:
Average rating:
3.40
(5 votes)
 
The popular access point for Sumas Mountain (off Sealund Road) utilizes private property. Hikers are asked to refrain from using this access point.
 
 
Ashland Lakes

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
5.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 800 ft.
Highest Point: 3000.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.64
(25 votes)
Hike a trail built mostly of boardwalk planking through peaty bogs beside three quiet little lakes. Established campsites with fire pits, benches and tent platforms await a weekend of camping with the kids. This trail also makes a pleasant weekday hike for those with creaky knees, as it is not difficult. As you hike, enjoy the many plants and animals that make the lowland bog environment home.
 
 
Bald Mountain via Ashland Lakes

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
20.0 miles, one-way
Rating:
Average rating:
2.33
(6 votes)
It used to be possible to traverse from Ashland Lakes to Bald Mountain, Cutthroat Lakes, and the Walt Bailey trail on trail. Now, the way is an overgrown, hard-to-follow bushwhack.
 
 
Cutthroat Lakes via Walt Bailey Trail

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
6.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2300 ft.
Highest Point: 4700.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(4 votes)
Great views await you at the summit of Bald Mountain or Cutthroat Lakes if you can stand the rough, rocky, and rooty trail that you must brave to get there. Fortunately, lots of lakes and berries keep you busy along the way, and the ever-changing surroundings on this CCC-built, WTA-maintained trail make for a great day hike along the popular Mountain Loop Highway.
 
 
Greider Lakes

Central Cascades -- Stevens Pass - West

 
8.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2035 ft.
Highest Point: 2930.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.47
(36 votes)
For those searching for alpine vistas with fewer visitors than on the most popular trails of the I-90 corridor, Greider Lakes is just right. This trailhead is located in the Sultan Basin Watershed.
 
 
Mount McCausland

Central Cascades -- Stevens Pass - East

 
7.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1800 ft.
Highest Point: 5747.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.78
(40 votes)
Mount McCausland delivers mountain views, lake views, and even solitude at the summit. The cost? The first three miles of the trail is easy, but the last half mile to the summit is steep and occasionally brushy. Taking a break on that climb is no hardship, though: the hillside is carpeted in berries and the views start early.
 
 
Heather - Maple Pass Loop

North Cascades -- North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
7.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2000 ft.
Highest Point: 6650.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.81
(113 votes)
If ever there was a hike to satisfy all a hiker's desires, this one comes as close as any. A loop hike with many fabulous changing faces throughout the seasons, Heather-Maple Pass features ridgelines blanketed in wildflowers in summer, lakes ringed with golden larches in fall, and before the highway closes for the season, a dramatic place to experience early winter’s snows.
 
 
Independence Pass Loop

South Cascades -- Mount St. Helens

 
6.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1665 ft.
Highest Point: 4700.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(5 votes)
The Independence Pass trail is impassable past the first 1.5 miles due to significant washouts and cannot currently be connected with the Boundary Trail to complete this loop.
 
 
Bullitt Gorge

Issaquah Alps -- Squak Mountain

 
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(6 votes)
Hike down the south side of Squak Mountain, connecting with the May Valley Loop Trail or the Perimeter Loop Trail.
 
 
Hidden Lake Lookout

North Cascades -- North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3300 ft.
Highest Point: 6900.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.62
(64 votes)
The Hidden Lake trail is one of the crown jewels of hiking in Washington State. No other trail offers so much as Hidden Lake Lookout: forest, wildflowers, a true alpine environment of stark granite well above treeline, breathtaking summit views of the heart of North Cascades National Park, and a fire lookout with a sweeping history almost as big as the mountainous landscape it gazes over.
 
 
Three Fingers

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
15.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4200 ft.
Highest Point: 6854.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.59
(17 votes)
 
A very challenging hike to a lookout in the Mountain Loop Area. Hike a road, then along a trail to gorgeous Goat Flats. From there, the route kicks up in difficulty as it accesses Tin Can Gap. The final push, up ladders rebarred into rock is exposed, and surefootedness is an absolute must at the lookout.
 
 
Goat Peak Lookout

North Cascades -- Methow/Sawtooth

 
3.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1400 ft.
Highest Point: 7001.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.37
(19 votes)
Views of majestic peaks and the vibrant golden hues of larches come autumn - Goat Peak Lookout offers both, as well as the commanding views you'd expect of a working fire lookout. Though steep at times, the trail's short length makes it a perfect hike to introduce kids and newer hikers to the grandeur of the Methow and North Cascades.
 
 
Rachel Lake

Snoqualmie Region -- Snoqualmie Pass

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1600 ft.
Highest Point: 4600.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.03
(77 votes)
From Rachel Lake you can access further adventures at Rampart Lakes, Lila Lakes and Alta Peak. This hike is a popular weekend overnight destination; so don’t expect to be by yourself in high season.
 
 
Sunday Lake

Snoqualmie Region -- North Bend Area

 
6.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 355 ft.
Highest Point: 1900.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.58
(12 votes)
Tucked into a corner of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness is Sunday Lake, a road less traveled that abounds in wildflowers, berries, fauna, historical artifacts, old growth, and alpine littoral habitat. Much more than the gentle woodland saunter implied by the 300-foot elevation change, the route to Sunday Lake requires the fording of Sunday Creek in spring and fall, making it an adventure any day of the week.
 
 
Tolmie Peak Lookout - Eunice Lake

Mount Rainier Area -- NW - Carbon River/Mowich

 
7.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1100 ft.
Highest Point: 5900.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.52
(96 votes)
Hike to an old fire lookout with in-your-face views of Mount Rainier and a sapphire blue lake below. Tolmie Peak and Eunice Lake pack a one-two punch when it comes to scenery, but stopping at the picturesque lake is a perfectly acceptable destination as well.
 
 
Lake Ingalls

Snoqualmie Region -- Salmon La Sac/Teanaway

 
9.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2500 ft.
Highest Point: 6500.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.31
(99 votes)
There's no question why Ingalls Lake is one of the most popular destinations in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness. It is a stunning blue lake, set high in a basin beneath rocky peaks, showcasing striking Mount Stuart as its backdrop. The trail to this treasure is filled with delights, both for the summer adventurer as well as for those hikers who appreciate fall colors. Views of the craggy Esmeralda Peaks, a walk through beautiful Headlight Basin plus a pretty picture of the imposing Stuart Range are just a few of the wonders along the way.
 
 
Cashmere Canyons Preserve

Central Cascades -- Leavenworth Area

 
12.0 miles of trails
Gain: 1800 ft.
Highest Point: 3259.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(1 vote)
Thanks to the generosity of the land owners, this privately-owned area is open to hikers, but managed primarily for wildlife habitat and wilderness conservation. Because of this, dogs and mountain biking are not allowed here, and the area may close the at various times throughout the year in order to protect wildlife. Please respect any and all closures.
 
 
Blanca Lake

Central Cascades -- Stevens Pass - West

 
7.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3300 ft.
Highest Point: 4600.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.44
(142 votes)
Visit one of the most striking lakes in the Henry M. Jackson wilderness. The vibrant blue of the glacier-fed lake provides the perfect rest stop for hikers who have braved the thirty-odd, steep switchbacks that lead to the lake.
 
 
Dosewallips River Road

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
13.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1200 ft.
Highest Point: 1550.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.06
(17 votes)
The Dosewallips River Road is the gateway to the eastern Olympic Mountains and it penetrates one of the deepest canyons in Olympic National Park. Now closed to vehicles, the old road bed allows hikers to explore true wilderness at a gentle grade. Backpackers, peak baggers, and horseback riders take advantage of the easy access to the trails beyond the road's end.
 
 
Rattlesnake Ledge

Snoqualmie Region -- North Bend Area

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1160 ft.
Highest Point: 2078.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.02
(350 votes)
This is a fine hike on a well maintained, albeit busy trail through a cool forest with views of the Cedar River watershed, Mount Si, Mount Washington, Rattlesnake Lake and Chester Morse Lake.
 
 
Deer Creek Falls

Mount Rainier Area -- SE - Cayuse Pass/Stevens Canyon

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 280 ft.
Highest Point: 3200.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.33
(9 votes)
If you don’t have the time or the inclination for the longer hike to Owyhigh Lakes, you can take a bite off the bigger trail and zip down about half a mile to see the charming 62-foot tiered falls of Deer Creek and a pair of footbridges traversing creeks flanked by a dense old forest.
 
 
Crystal Peak

Mount Rainier Area -- NE - Sunrise/White River

 
8.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3100 ft.
Highest Point: 6595.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.10
(30 votes)
Check the weather before heading out for this hike, and if it’s going to be clear, bring a camera. From the summit, it’s possible to see six (yes, six!) volcanoes spanning two states. Baker, Glacier, Adams, Rainier, St. Helens and Hood wait patiently for you to climb the more-than-moderately steep path to the summit of Crystal Peak, where you can take in beautiful snow-capped majesty from the top.
 
 
Cascade Pass and Sahale Arm

North Cascades -- North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
12.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 4000 ft.
Highest Point: 7570.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.44
(66 votes)
9/17/2021 - The Cascade River Road is closed at milepost 20 due to road damage.
In Sahale Arm, the forces of nature have conspired to create an improbably gentle, gorgeous landscape. A scenic trail ambles peacefully through rolling alpine meadows blanketing the broad shoulder of Sahale Mountain. This park-like setting is made all the more spectacular by contrast with the dramatic mountainous terrain that stretches off in every direction near and far. Simply put, this is one of the most beautiful hikes in all of Washington.
 
 
Blue Lake

North Cascades -- North Cascades Highway - Hwy 20

 
4.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1050 ft.
Highest Point: 6254.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.37
(68 votes)
At 6254 feet, Blue Lake sits quietly a little over two trail miles from Highway 20. With towering granite peaks, forests, meadows, wildflowers, and of course the beautiful mountain lake surrounded by granite that reaches for the sky, this short hike is easily a classic and should be on your must-hike list. With only 1050 feet of elevation gain this hike is doable for almost everyone. If you’re driving over Highway 20 and don’t have all day, stop for this mountain gem.
 
 
Longs Pass

Snoqualmie Region -- Salmon La Sac/Teanaway

 
5.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2100 ft.
Highest Point: 6250.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.25
(16 votes)
Longs Pass provides unbelievable views, but only after an unbelievable amount of elevation gain. In less than 3 miles, you'll climb more than 2000 feet in elevation -- that's quite like climbing a staircase for three miles. It's shady the first half, but soon comes out into an exposed area; bring as much water as you can carry!
 
 
Mount Angeles

Olympic Peninsula -- Northern Coast

 
6.25 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2100 ft.
Highest Point: 6454.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(13 votes)
A scramble up Mount Angeles just off the Klahhane Ridge hike in Olympic National Park.
 
 
Mount Pilchuck

North Cascades -- Mountain Loop Highway

 
5.4 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2300 ft.
Highest Point: 5327.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.58
(184 votes)
Despite its intermediate difficulty, Mount Pilchuck sees a slew of visitors in a given year, as hikers flock to the trail for its grand panoramic views and historic restored fire lookout. Easily one of the most rewarding hikes in the area, its relatively short 2.7 mile, 2,300 feet ascent gifts you 360-degree views of Mount Baker, Mount Rainier and the Olympics from its shelter lookout, which sits nestled on a summit that tops out around 5,300 feet. This calf-friendly journey is all made possible by a high elevation trailhead, which sets you off on your travels around 3,000 feet, cutting what would otherwise be an arduous ten mile roundtrip in half.
 
 
Ira Spring Trail - Mason Lake

Snoqualmie Region -- Snoqualmie Pass

 
6.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 2420 ft.
Highest Point: 4320.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.19
(132 votes)
Sun drenched ridgelines, blooming trillium, and sparkling alpine waters define this fitting tribute to one of Washington’s greatest trail advocates.
 
 
Nisqually Vista Loop

Mount Rainier Area -- SW - Longmire/Paradise

 
1.1 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 5400.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.80
(10 votes)
Follow the trails here to views of Mount Rainier's rocky Nisqually River valley and the much-receded Nisqually Glacier.